I Am Not You and You Are Not Me: Why Judgment Of Others’ Bodies Needs To Fall Away

Being able to be real about things is as sexy to me as self-confidence. Reclaiming words is awesome.

“Reclaiming the word fat was the most empowering step in my progress. I stopped using it for insult or degradation and instead replaced it with truth, because the truth is that I am fat, and that’s ok. So now when someone calls me fat, I agree, whereas before I would get embarrassed and emotional.”
— Beth Ditto of Gossip

In his article, The Obesity Era, David Berreby outlines a multitude of factors that can contribute to obesity, from the overly simplistic law of thermodynamics (i.e. put down the fork), to the starvation of previous generations, industrial chemicals like BPA, artificial light, viruses, bacteria, thermoneutral environments that don’t make the body work to maintain homeostasis (air conditioning, for example), differing qualities of calories, and the one which he appears to most favour: the machinations of Capitalism, a theory set forth by Jonathan C. K. Wells. I like this theory because it’s far-reaching, makes sense as it was explained in the article, and also because I’m biased against Capitalism. Heavily so, so to speak.

In reading the comments section (yes, I know! and I did it anyway!), it really brings home the fact that there is no one true cause of anything and that if everybody did the same thing, there would be n results, where n=the number of participants/everybody. By which I mean that an individualized and holistic approach needs to be considered because what works for me isn’t going to work for you. Every body is made differently. We are not robots created in a factory setting, but too many people think and respond as though we were, without taking metabolism, illness, injury, medication, genetics, or overarching societal and economic machinations into account. All that one-size-fits-all approach does is shame people who don’t fit the prescribed norm of what a human body is supposed to look like.

 

What is a human body supposed to look like?

This made me cry: real women by Hanne Blank, someone whose writing I was introduced to over a decade ago. I haven’t really kept up with her, but I have pretty much always loved what she has written. It was the part where she said, Real women are fat.  And thin.  And both, and neither, and otherwise.  Doesn’t make them any less real. It was the ‘both’ part that did it. If you’ve read other posts of mine, you may have noted that I’m ‘pear-shaped’. My top is more slight than my bottom. My life from the point at which my hips lurched out to either side — and I swear that’s what they did, it happened so fast. I only got to wear those awesome batik parachute pants twice because I suddenly couldn’t fit them over my hips, and I was absolutely devastated. Yeah, that’s right. Parachute pants. Batik. Devastated. I’m still a bit upset about it, to be honest. — From that point forward, I felt very much like a person from one of those books of people, the pages of which are bisected at the person’s waist, and you can mix and match jeans with blouse with skirt with male with female with suit top with pyjama pants with overalls, etc. I’m two different people, top to bottom, bisected at the waist. An extra small on top and a medium on the bottom. And prior to pregnancy, there was a 12″ difference between my waist and my hips.

Hanne continues:

There is a phrase I wish I could engrave upon the hearts of every single person, everywhere in the world, and it is this sentence which comes from the genius lips of the grand and eloquent Mr. Glenn Marla:

There is no wrong way to have a body.

 

I’m going to say it again because it’s important: There is no wrong way to have a body.

And if your moral compass points in any way, shape, or form to equality, you need to get this through your thick skull and stop with the “real women are like such-and-so” crap.

You are not the authority on what “real” human beings are, and who qualifies as “real” and on what basis.  All human beings are real.

Yes, I know you’re tired of feeling disenfranchised.  It is a tiresome and loathsome thing to be and to feel.  But the tit-for-tat disenfranchisement of others is not going to solve that problem.  Solidarity has to start somewhere and it might as well be with you and me.

This, my friends, is a thing of beauty. And you know what else? So’s your body. It is a thing of beauty and it is real and it’s what a human body is supposed to look like.

And just as there are plenty of ways we fat-shame, there are ways we thin-shame, too. Being 5’1″, I’ve been relegated to the category of tiny and cute, or at least that’s how it appears people think of me as being. I’m also about 120-ish* lbs and my ribs show across my chest. I’m thin and have a difficult time putting on weight and an easy time losing it. I often don’t feel like I’m ‘qualified’ to talk about fat acceptance because of these things — because I’m on the outside. *(I don’t have a scale, or rest assured, I’d have the exact number for you. Why don’t I have a scale? Because I have two young boys with poor impulse control who will bounce on it until it breaks. That’s why.)

Thin-shaming vs following Wheaton’s Law: How Not To Be A Dick To Your Skinny Friends by Beulah Devaney via xoJane.

 

There is no wrong way to have a body

The body you have and/or the body you are working toward having, is a good and worthy body. And you are whatever gender you say you are. And if you identify as a man, then you’re a real man. And if you identify as a woman, then you’re a real woman. This graphic says it best:

people are people whatever their parts

Don’t even get me started on radical feminist transphobia. OMFG. And yes, I am an ardent feminist because I believe that women are equal to men. And I believe that women who were born with penises are still women. Exclusionary bullshit always feels bad. Do humanity a favour and quit being so insecure about yourselves, ok? Same goes for all the insecure men who’ve sexually assaulted… well… anyone because they feel the need to prove themselves more manly and more powerful than cis-women, trans-women, and trans-men. Give the world a break, folks. No one needs your bullshit. Save it for therapy, k? In the meantime, this about sums it up as to how simple it is:  Continue reading